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Online Teaching Classes

Curriculum Details

39–41 total credits required

The MAT program requires a specific set of online teaching classes each semester. As you complete your degree, each semester will build upon the knowledge you gained in the previous online teaching classes.

Requirements

In this course, teacher candidates examine and implement methods of instructional intervention for middle and secondary students with reading deficits. Teacher candidates focus on addressing the content-specific needs of English Language Learners and students who have reading and comprehension disabilities. Teacher candidates also examine various reading assessments as well as assistive technologies that can be used in content specific courses. Teacher candidate will research a specific reading disability and create a data driven action plan.

This course will require teacher candidates to examine and implement differentiated instruction in the middle school and high school classroom settings. The teacher candidate will examine co-teaching models, including the roles of and responsibilities of each participant. The teacher candidate will examine different classroom management strategies and the importance of building classroom community and culture. Teacher candidates will create and teach multiple differentiated lesson plans. Teacher candidates will also create a classroom management plan. This course requires a 45-hour mid-level field experience. Teacher candidates will investigate student behaviors, research-based methodologies, and create management plans based on simulated classrooms.

This course explores how reading and writing inter-relate with different content areas, crossing subject matter lines. Teacher candidates investigate how reading and writing skill development are supported in content areas. Teacher candidates will research current best practices in developing comprehension and higher order thinking skills in lesson design aligned to the Missouri Learning Standards.

The student will experience practical approaches to ensure that classroom assessment is fair and effective. Curriculum mapping and alignment to standards are explored. Students will develop an understanding of the basic mathematics of measurement, item analysis, test score interpretation, test development, performance assessments, standardized testing, portfolios, grading procedures self-assessment, assessment of diverse student populations, and biases in educational assessment. Student reflection will facilitate an appreciation for the characteristics of an assessment-literate educator. Using data driven decision-making, students will analyze authentic student data and apply research-based strategies to create a plan for instruction to impact student learning. Teacher candidates will research a self-selected topic and create a scholarly paper.

This course consists of a general introduction to the area of elementary and secondary education for the graduate student seeking teacher certification. Teacher candidates will review educational law and ethical codes and apply them to classroom scenarios. Teacher candidates will examine the spectrum of diversity in the context of schools. Class presentations covering a variety of education topics will be required. Teacher candidates will be introduced to learning standards and objectives, Depth of Knowledge, and Bloom’s taxonomy. An early level field experience is required, which may include a Saturday commitment. Teacher candidates must obtain a clear criminal background check to participate in the field experience. A nominal fee is required for requesting a background check. Teacher candidates will also pay a site license fee for their portfolio.

This course introduces and combines principles of human development, educational psychology, and special education. Teacher candidates will compare the application of methods based on research in cognitive science with those based on principles of behaviorism. Topics include creating positive learning environments and supportive relationships for learning, increasing motivation, problem-solving, assessing student performance, and planning instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Teacher candidates will also explore the history of, legal basis for, and contemporary issues in special education. They will examine characteristics of exceptionalities, the referral process, service delivery models, and Individualized Education Programs.

This course orients students to the requirements of the teacher education program and field experiences. Students will be required to purchase Foliotek, an electronic portfolio system, if they have not already done so. Students must have earned a minimum of nine EDU/EDS coursework credits, and a minimum GPA to be accepted into the teacher education program and to pass this course. If students do not pass this course, they will not be allowed to enroll in many upper level education courses. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

This course will allow teacher candidates to examine the specific techniques and procedures for effective teaching at the elementary level. Teacher candidates will examine what is required to design and prepare logical, engaging, and rigorous lessons that meet the needs of all learners. This course will explore various approaches for planning lessons including the direct teaching and co-teaching models. Teacher candidates will apply Bloom’s Taxonomy as related to lesson plan objectives and assessments in planned lessons. The technology examined will review and/or introduce use of instructional technologies as teaching tools, including but not limited to Microsoft Word, Power Point, Microsoft Excel, Smart Board, and smart phone and tablet applications. Students will focus on the use of technology integration in instruction and lesson design and will be assigned several technology-driven assignments to demonstrate understanding instructional technology. The instructor will demonstrate various technology tools. Students will be strongly encouraged to obtain level 1 Google Certification in this course and will be provided information and access to the training.

In this course, students will explore theories regarding innovation and the challenges associated with innovating in an educational culture. Students will examine aspects of an innovator’s mindset, as well as behaviors and practices conducive to the effecting and sustaining of innovations.

This course is designed to provide an overview of education from historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives. Students will expand on their understanding of contemporary education through an investigation of the changing role of educators in current social, political, and economic times using current peer reviewed articles and other open educational resources (OER).

This course is designed to engage practitioners in the collection, evaluation, and interpretation of educational research for use in a variety of educational practices. The student will investigate the basis of educational research, along with pertinent methods of data collection and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research results. Emphasis will be placed on research problems, designs, and findings in the student’s selected area of concentration. Students will be expected to demonstrate their ability to narrow a research topic, complete accepted scholarly search strategies, identify and synthesize research articles, and correctly format a literature review using established APA guidelines.

This course is designed to be the culminating experience in a teacher candidate’s educator preparation program; thus, students should have completed all the courses and assessments necessary for the degree and certification prior to this course. A weekly seminar is required. Teacher candidate must successfully assume responsibilities of the cooperating teacher including, but not limited to: planning and implementing lessons, assessing students, and analyzing performance data to improve instruction. Teacher candidates will be expected to participate in vertical and horizontal team meetings at the placement site. Graduate level rigor will be expected when completing assignments and activities supporting Missouri Educator Evaluation System standards and indicators. Additional professional development experiences and reflections will be required of the graduate level teacher candidate. The teacher candidate is responsible for arranging and paying the expense of transportation to and from the assigned placement. A student teaching lab fee is required. Course enrollment must be approved by the Council of Teacher Education.

Choose 3 hours from following

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. Lab fee required. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

This graduate level course examines a variety of teaching methods in middle and high schools, including, but not limited to: inquiry, cooperative learning, differentiation, and interdisciplinary instruction, classroom simulations as well as specific teaching strategies unique to the subject area. As a culminating project, teacher candidates will develop a Unit Plan of Instruction. During the semester, teacher candidates will be expected to evaluate the objectives of the class as a comparison to the state standards. Teacher candidates will also be expected to evaluate several academic sources and create a culminating graduate project over the various methodologies of the subject area, including an annotated bibliography. This course requires a 20-hour practicum.

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