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Art History Courses Online

Curriculum Details

36 total credits required

The online master’s in art history and visual culture program requires 36 credit hours of art history courses online, including 18 credits from core courses. You may select the remaining credits based on your professional interests in art and culture.

Required Courses (18 hours)

Supervised work experience for graduate students which requires the advanced application of principles, skills, and strategies within the discipline. Requires signed internship agreement by student, faculty of record, and supervisor representing host organization. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours and is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

This course is a study of art in Europe from the later eighteenth century to the early twentieth, focusing on the major works and movements, such as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. The crosscurrents of major stylistic trends and how they relate to other movements in the sciences, literature and music will be explored in specific case studies. Students will analyze the relationship between art, politics, religion, and culture in order to examine, in depth, the emergence of modernism.

This course is an investigation of the developments in Europe from 1600 to 1750 in Italy, France, Spain, Flanders, and Holland. The socio-cultural forces behind the style that would become known as the “baroque” will be discussed, as well as its dissemination and regional adaptations across Europe and eventually the New World and Asia. Students will analyze how art was used as a vehicle for ideological and/or political supremacy by a range of rulers and organizations.

This course is a study of the developments in art and architecture from the dawn of civilization to Late Antiquity. Major monuments and works shall be covered from cultures in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Aegean, Greece, and Rome. Students will analyze how influential these cultures in the Middle East and North Africa were for the development of Western civilization with Greece and Rome.

This course is a study of European art from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century through the end of the Middle Ages in 1400. Beginning in Late Antiquity with Early Christian and Byzantine art, the influx of peoples on the fringe of Roman civilization shall be discussed as they settled in regions throughout Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East, reshaping those areas. Students will analyze these heterogeneous cultures as they slowly adopted Christianity through the Early Medieval/Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian, Ottonian, and later Middle Ages.

This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the late nineteenth century through the Second World War. The art of this period is characterized by extraordinary experimentation and innovation in styles, materials, techniques, and modes of dissemination. In addition to painting and sculpture, the 20th century witnessed the rise in popularity of photography, collage, montage, installations, earth art, performance, and conceptual art. Students will investigate the cultural and intellectual factors that both reflect and helped shape it with styles such as Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, and Surrealism.

This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the Second World War to the Post-modern era and examines the social and historical contexts of art produced, their theoretical justifications and critical receptions, and their varied functions. Beginning with Abstract Expressionism following the War, artists reacted to the political environment and the new emigres from Europe and dematerialized art, looking to engage with new audiences with new media and messages.

This course is an investigation of the issues relating to gender and sexuality in the Renaissance and Baroque eras. Students will review case studies on the social constructions of gender roles of both masculinities and femininities that include primary historical accounts, literary criticism, social criticism, as well as gender studies and women’s studies.

This course investigates the art and architecture of the Americas, Africa, Australia and Oceania, as well as Asia. The exchanges between cultures are explored in their broad contexts and specific case studies. Students will analyze the roles played by politics, religion, and other cultural forces in shaping the art and material culture of each civilization. Special attention will be paid to the effects of colonization and globalization on these regions and the syncretism that occurs with cross-cultural exchanges.

This course will provide an in-depth examination of the role and history of photography from its beginnings in the 1830s to the present. Focusing on the key figures, periods, and concepts in the development of this medium, the course will follow the evolution of photography alongside the other visual arts, culminating in its primacy at the end of the twentieth century. Photography as an artistic vehicle and technological tool has advanced many areas of investigation in the sciences and arts. Students will investigate the debate over the evolving technological and technical processes in case studies, and the “nature” of the medium, as well as the influence it has had on the broader evolution of the history of art.

This course is the study of the history of graphic design, communication, and popular visual culture from the late nineteenth century to the present with an emphasis on the influence of technology, culture, major artistic movements, and socio-political factors on the evolution of graphic design. Students will investigate the development of the design field in Europe and the United States in case studies and analyze how theories relating to mass production, politics, and social psychology affected trends from Art Nouveau to Postmodernism.

This course investigates the history of video games and gaming from their influences and precursors to contemporary gaming on various platforms. Major game genres and technological developments shall be discussed within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the application of critical theory to the discipline. Students shall analyze the socio-historical influences on the industry, as well as the psychology of game play and design.

This course is a study of the historical perspective of film from the efforts of early American and European filmmakers. Emphasis will be placed on the art of filmmaking, and its reflection of culture through in-depth analyses of case studies. Films would include works from Griffith, Eisenstein, Truffaut, Bergman, Kurosawa, and others.

This advanced lecture course is a study of social and cultural history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women and children from primitive times through the 1800s. Emphasis shall be placed on how politics, economics, and technology affect the changing silhouettes of each period.

This advanced lecture course is a study of social and cultural history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women and children from 1900. Emphasis shall be placed on how politics, economics, and technology affect the changing silhouettes of each period.

This course investigates the history of new media and digital art from their influences and precursors in photography to digital technologies impact on art. Students will analyze case studies of major genres and technological developments within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the applicability of critical theory to the discipline.

This course is a study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Renaissance in Italy from 1300 to 1600. Students will review case studies and analyze the cultural products that began with the late Middle Ages and investigate how new formats and techniques of painting was brought from the east and led to a revolution in art first in Italy, then spreading to Northern Europe. Furthermore, students will analyze how art was used as a vehicle for ideological and/or political supremacy by a range of rulers and organizations.

This course will investigate the Classical myths of ancient Greece and Rome in their cultural context. The principle myths shall be covered to further elucidate the relationship between myth and literature, and then the rather different relationship between myth and art, so as to understand better the nature of the sources for the myths and their use in Greco-Roman religion and epistemology. Students will analyze case studies and the various strategies for interpretation that include physical allegory, historical allegory, moral allegory, as well as anthropological and linguistic theories.

Special topics in art history. May be repeated as topics vary. Lab/course fee may be required.

This course is an investigation of the major theoretical and critical lines of thought that have shaped our understanding of the arts, their role in society, as well as their reception, use and appreciation from antiquity to the present. Through case studies, students will engage with the major theories, including Formalism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, Feminism, Marxism, Psychology, Gender Studies, Deconstruction, and more.

This course offers independent study opportunities in art history. A program of study is formulated with an advisor that outlines research tools, procedures, and methods of evaluation. Presentation of a final project in terms of a research paper is required.

This course offers independent study opportunities in art history. A program of study is formulated with an advisor that outlines research tools, procedures, and methods of evaluation. Presentation of a final project in terms of a research paper is required.

This course offers independent study opportunities in art history. A program of study is formulated with an advisor that outlines research tools, procedures, and methods of evaluation. Presentation of a final project in terms of a research paper is required.

Core Curriculum (21 hours)

This course is an introduction to research methods, historiography, and critical theory. The course introduces the language of research and shifts in practice over time through an examination of both modern and postmodern theories. Participants will use these theoretical underpinnings to begin to critically review literature relevant to their field or interests and determine how research findings are useful in forming their understanding of their own work.

This course explores the tools and methods used to write graduate-level research papers. Students will be introduced to advanced research techniques, thesis development and refinement, differentiation of primary and secondary sources, and effective writing for their own discipline. Through the process, students will recognize and address the strengths and weaknesses in their critical thinking and writing skills and produce successful research projects that demonstrate knowledge of topics and proficiency in writing skills in their own field.

This course is the first in two seminars where students conduct research in their fields and produce independent graduate projects. Students are encouraged to begin exploration into advanced issues, methods, and critical theory in order to identify the topic for their final thesis and begin gathering research toward that goal. This course is repeatable for a maximum of six credit hours. Lab fee required.

This course is the second in two seminars where students conduct research in their fields and produce independent graduate projects. Students are encouraged to begin exploration into advanced issues, methods, and critical theory in order to identify the topic for their final thesis and begin gathering research toward that goal. This course is repeatable for a maximum of six credit hours. Lab fee required.

The examination requires students to demonstrate mastery in their field of study in breadth and depth through assessments on key concepts and by synthesizing the materials presented. The comprehensive exam may be retaken only once and must be passed by the midpoint of the program unless otherwise indicated. The grade for this course will be either Pass or Fail. This course is repeatable. Lab fee required.

The directed thesis project consists of a project in the student’s field completed during the course of graduate studies and/or a supporting written thesis depending upon the program. The thesis project and topic must be approved by a committee of three faculty members, two of which must be from the student’s own program. After students finalize their topic with their committee chair, research into and execution of the project begins. This course is repeatable for a maximum of six credit hours. Lab fee required.

The directed thesis project consists of a project in the student’s field completed during the course of graduate studies and/or a supporting written thesis depending upon the program. The approval of the thesis project topic, and demonstrable progress of initial research/execution must be completed in AMC 60000. Final production of the thesis project and/or written thesis will be completed under faculty direction and evaluated by the student’s committee. This course is repeatable for a maximum of six credit hours. Lab fee required.

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