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Art History Classes Online

Curriculum Details

120 total credits required

The online art history degree requires 120 total credit hours, including 36 from art history classes online and 4–9 credits from capstone courses. In addition to completing art history classes online, you must also be enrolled in a practicum section each term.

Studio Foundation

This course teaches the formal elements and principles of design, color theory, perception and problem solving as applied to a two-dimensional surface.

Art History Foundation

Arts/Human Diversity This course is a historical survey of Western art and architecture from Prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages in 1300 with an emphasis on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion, and politics. Major works of art and architecture will be discussed from the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece-Rome, and finally the Middle Ages. This course is open to all students and required for all majors within the department of Art and Design.

Arts/Human Diversity This course is a historical survey of Western art and architecture from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion, and politics. Major works of art and architecture will be discussed as a survey of major artistic movements from the fourteenth to the late twentieth century across Europe and America. This course is open to all students and is required for all majors within the department of Art and Design.

Arts/Human Diversity This course examines the art and architecture of Asia, Oceania, Africa, the Middle East, and Native North and South America. This course offers an introductory survey of major non-Eurocentric cultures and movements and invites students to understand and interpret these in historical and visual contexts. Focusing on the issues of patronage, function and socio-political and religious significance of these non-Western works, an in-depth understanding of their place in the historical continuum shall be brought to bear.

Pre-1800 Art History (6 hours)

This course is a study of the developments in Europe from 1600 to 1750 in Italy, France, Spain, Flanders and Holland. Major works and monuments shall be discussed, such as the completion of New St. Peters and the palace of Versailles; as well as major artists, such as Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt and Velázquez, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion and politics.

This course is a study of the developments in art and architecture from the dawn of civilization to the early Middle Ages. Major monuments and works shall be covered in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, and Rome, including the great Ziggurats of Mesopotamia, the Pyramids at Giza, the Parthenon, Pantheon and Colosseum. Emphasis shall be placed on the interrelationship of art, culture, religion and politics.

This course is a study of European art from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century through the end of the Middle Ages in 1400. Beginning with Early Christian and Byzantine art, the major periods, works and monuments shall be discussed including those in the Early Medieval era-Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian and Ottonian-as well as the later Middle Ages and Romanesque and Gothic art, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion and politics.
This course is a study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Renaissance from 1300 to 1600. Beginning with late Medieval art, the major periods, works and monuments shall be discussed including those of the Early Renaissance, High Renaissance and Late Renaissance, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion, and politics.

This course will investigate the Classical myths of ancient Greece and Rome in their cultural context. An overview of the principle myths shall be treated in order to discuss the relationship between myth and literature, and then the rather different relationship between myth and art, so as to understand better the nature of the sources for the myths and their use in Greco-Roman religion and epistemology.

This course is a study of social and cultural history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women, and children from primitive times to 1900. Emphasis is given to the ways in which politics, economics, and technology affected the changing silhouettes of each period.

Post-1800 Art History (6 hours)

This course is a study of art in Europe from the later eighteenth century to the early twentieth, focusing on the major works and movements, such as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Emphasis shall be paid to the relationship between art, politics, religion and culture in order to examine, in depth, the emergence of modernism.

This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the late nineteenth century through the Second World War. Major movements shall be discussed, including Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism, ending with Abstract Expressionism, emphasizing the relationships between art, culture, politics and religion.
This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the Second World War to the Post-modern era. The development of contemporary art and the contributions made since Abstract Expressionism in the visual arts and architecture are examined, emphasizing the relationships between art, culture, politics and religion.

This course will examine the role and history of photography from its beginnings in the 1830s to the present. Focusing on the key figures, periods, and concepts in the development of this medium, the course will follow the evolution of photography alongside the other visual arts, culminating in its primacy at the end of the twentieth century. Photography as an artistic vehicle and technological tool has advanced many areas of investigation in the sciences and arts. Thus the debate over the evolving technological and technical processes, and the “nature” of the medium, will be discussed as well as the influence it has had on the broader evolution of the history of art.

This course is the study of the history of graphic design from its appearance in prehistory to the present with an emphasis on the influence of technology, culture, major artistic movements, and socio-political factors on the evolution of graphic design. The work and philosophies of historically significant design movements, designers, and design firms will be studied in depth through readings, lectures, as well as technical application.

This course will explore the history of video games from their influences and precursors to contemporary gaming on various platforms. Major game genres and technological developments shall be discussed within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the application of critical theory to the discipline.

This course will explore the history of new media and digital art from their influences and precursors in photography to digital technologies impact on art. Major genres and technological developments shall be discussed within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the application of critical theory to the discipline.

This course is a study of the historical perspective of film from the efforts of early American and European filmmakers through the works of contemporary artists around the world. Emphasis will be placed on the ART of film making, and its reflection of culture. Films would include works from Griffith, Eisenstein, Truffaut, Bergman, Kurosawa, and others. Open to all students.

This course is a study of social history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women, and children in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the impact of cultural, political, and social changes. Emphasis is given to the ways in which politics, economics, and technology affected the changing silhouettes of each period, while exploring fashion and the psychology of dress in culturally diverse settings.

Art History Electives (6 hours)

This course is a study of art in Europe from the later eighteenth century to the early twentieth, focusing on the major works and movements, such as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Emphasis shall be paid to the relationship between art, politics, religion and culture in order to examine, in depth, the emergence of modernism.

This course is a study of the developments in Europe from 1600 to 1750 in Italy, France, Spain, Flanders and Holland. Major works and monuments shall be discussed, such as the completion of New St. Peters and the palace of Versailles; as well as major artists, such as Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt and Velázquez, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion and politics.

This course is a study of the developments in art and architecture from the dawn of civilization to the early Middle Ages. Major monuments and works shall be covered in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, and Rome, including the great Ziggurats of Mesopotamia, the Pyramids at Giza, the Parthenon, Pantheon and Colosseum. Emphasis shall be placed on the interrelationship of art, culture, religion and politics.

This course is a study of European art from the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century through the end of the Middle Ages in 1400. Beginning with Early Christian and Byzantine art, the major periods, works and monuments shall be discussed including those in the Early Medieval era-Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian and Ottonian-as well as the later Middle Ages and Romanesque and Gothic art, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion and politics.
This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the late nineteenth century through the Second World War. Major movements shall be discussed, including Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, and Surrealism, ending with Abstract Expressionism, emphasizing the relationships between art, culture, politics and religion.
This course is a study of the developments in Europe and America from the Second World War to the Post-modern era. The development of contemporary art and the contributions made since Abstract Expressionism in the visual arts and architecture are examined, emphasizing the relationships between art, culture, politics and religion.
This course is a study of the issues relating to gender in the Renaissance and Baroque eras, including social constructions of gender roles both masculinities and femininities.
This course is a study of select non-Eurocentric cultures and their art and architecture in their original contexts. Particular emphasis will be given to social, cultural, aesthetic, and political contexts in which artistic practices developed embodied in art forms from Asia, Oceania, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and others.

This course will examine the role and history of photography from its beginnings in the 1830s to the present. Focusing on the key figures, periods, and concepts in the development of this medium, the course will follow the evolution of photography alongside the other visual arts, culminating in its primacy at the end of the twentieth century. Photography as an artistic vehicle and technological tool has advanced many areas of investigation in the sciences and arts. Thus the debate over the evolving technological and technical processes, and the “nature” of the medium, will be discussed as well as the influence it has had on the broader evolution of the history of art.

This course is the study of the history of graphic design from its appearance in prehistory to the present with an emphasis on the influence of technology, culture, major artistic movements, and socio-political factors on the evolution of graphic design. The work and philosophies of historically significant design movements, designers, and design firms will be studied in depth through readings, lectures, as well as technical application.

This course will explore the history of video games from their influences and precursors to contemporary gaming on various platforms. Major game genres and technological developments shall be discussed within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the application of critical theory to the discipline.

This course will explore the history of new media and digital art from their influences and precursors in photography to digital technologies impact on art. Major genres and technological developments shall be discussed within their appropriate socio-historical contexts, as well as the application of critical theory to the discipline.

This course is a study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Renaissance from 1300 to 1600. Beginning with late Medieval art, the major periods, works and monuments shall be discussed including those of the Early Renaissance, High Renaissance and Late Renaissance, focusing on the relationship between art, society, culture, religion, and politics.

This course will investigate the Classical myths of ancient Greece and Rome in their cultural context. An overview of the principle myths shall be treated in order to discuss the relationship between myth and literature, and then the rather different relationship between myth and art, so as to understand better the nature of the sources for the myths and their use in Greco-Roman religion and epistemology.

Special topics in art history. May be repeated as topics vary. Course fee may be required.

Special topics in art history. May be repeated as topics vary. Course fee may be required.

Special topics in art history. May be repeated as topics vary. Course fee may be required.

This course is a study of the major theoretical and critical lines of thought that have shaped understanding of the arts, their role in society, and their reception, use, and appreciation from antiquity to the present.

This independent research class allows students to develop a focused topic working closely with a faculty member to conduct research. Advanced research methods will be utilized to develop a thorough bibliography of primary, secondary and theoretical sources on the student’s topic, often developing their capstone paper further. This is an undergraduate research course.

This course is a study of the historical perspective of film from the efforts of early American and European filmmakers through the works of contemporary artists around the world. Emphasis will be placed on the ART of film making, and its reflection of culture. Films would include works from Griffith, Eisenstein, Truffaut, Bergman, Kurosawa, and others. Open to all students.
This course is a survey of historical and contemporary Asian films, particularly those of Japan, China, India, and Korea. Emphasis will be placed on the social/cultural significance of selected Asian motion pictures and their relationship to Western counterparts. The course will concentrate on the definitive works of major Asian film directors, including Kurosawa, Ozu, Tsui, Wong, and Woo.

This course is a study of social and cultural history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women, and children from primitive times to 1900. Emphasis is given to the ways in which politics, economics, and technology affected the changing silhouettes of each period.

This course is a study of social history and the resulting costumes worn by men, women, and children in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the impact of cultural, political, and social changes. Emphasis is given to the ways in which politics, economics, and technology affected the changing silhouettes of each period, while exploring fashion and the psychology of dress in culturally diverse settings.

This course will examine and discuss the role of nonprofit organizations in society. The focus will be on the political, social, cultural, and economic impacts including advocacy roles involving scientific, environmental, human services, and human rights issues and will include a volunteer component. Lab fee may be required.

This course examines the differences between for profit and nonprofit organizations and includes examination of philanthropy and techniques of fundraising, relationships with umbrella funding organizations, government funding, and budgeting. Lab fee may be required.

This course examines philanthropic grant writing and techniques of fund development. The focus is on relationship building in resource development; writing grants, understanding relationships with umbrella funding organizations, government funding, grantsmanship, and budgeting. Lab fee may be required.

Required Major Course

All art history majors are required to enroll in Art History Practicum every fall and spring semester throughout their program of study. Students will actively participate in departmental activities through various assignments and meetings. This course is Pass/Fail. May be repeated.

Capstone

Supervised work experience for the advanced student which requires the application of principles, skills, and strategies within the discipline. Requires signed internship agreement by student, faculty of record, and supervisor representing host organization. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours and is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

This capstone course seeks to introduce art history students to the methods of research and criticism applied to typical art-historical problems through familiarizing the student with bibliography, research tools and the approaches of different methodologies. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the canon of art via written examination, produce a methodological research paper and present their original research in an oral presentation. This course is required for all Art History majors.

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